Reduced Visual Acuity: What Are The Common Causes?

The patient is taking an eye test.

Does reduced visual acuity normal? As part of the aging process, low or blurred vision is common. However, it does not mean that you do not need to do something about it. Getting an eye checkup can determine if the symptom has a significant underlying problem. In some cases, periodontal disease can affect your vision. Addressing your dental issues may improve your overall health.

Does reduced visual acuity normal? As part of the aging process, low or blurred vision is common. However, it does not mean that you do not need to do something about it. Getting an eye checkup can determine if the symptom has a significant underlying problem. In some cases, periodontal disease can affect your vision. Addressing your dental issues may improve your overall health.

 

Visual Acuity: What is Normal Vision?

Visual acuity refers to recognizing the form, size, and other details of the things you see. The term 20/20 vision is used to express the normal visual acuity estimated at a distance of 20 feet. Suppose you have 20/20 vision or normal vision. In that case, you can perceive things clearly at 20 feet what should typically be understood at that distance. While if you have 20/100 vision, it implies that you should be just about as close as 20 feet to see what an individual with normal vision can see at 100 feet.

Moreover, having normal visual acuity does not really mean you have perfect vision. 20/20 vision just demonstrates the clarity or sharpness of vision at a distance. Also, other significant vision abilities, including peripheral awareness or side vision, eye coordination, focusing capability, depth perception, and color vision, add to your general visual skill.

 

What Causes Reduced Visual Acuity?

Having reduced visual acuity means that you do not have normal vision or 20/20 vision. Generally, eye problems or diseases can result in visual impairment. The following are some of the more common reasons for reduced visual acuity.

 

Macular Degeneration

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) or macular degeneration is an eye disease that affects the retina, the light-sensitive covering at the rear of the eye. The macula is the region on the retina that is liable for sharp focal vision-deteriorates, resulting in blurred vision. A person with this condition can experience trouble reading and a blind spot in the central space of sight for some.

The most typical type of macular degeneration is called non-exudative, or the dry structure, in which vision loss generally advances gradually. More severe and fast vision loss comes from exudative or wet types of age-related macular degeneration. In the wet structure, unusual blood vessels create under the macula and release fluid and blood.

The specific reason for this condition is obscure. Though age is the essential contributing variable, cigarette smoking and nutrition can likewise assume a part in advancing age-related macular degeneration. A genetic adolescent type of macular degeneration known as Stargardt Macular Dystrophy can similarly result in vision loss.

 

Glaucoma

Glaucoma is the result of damage to the optic nerve. The adult patient gets an eye checkup because he experienced reduce visual acuity.This happens because of expanding inward pressure in the eye because of issues with the drainage or flow of fluid inside the eye. It can likewise occur when the inside pressing factor of the eye does not expand, yet there is not sufficient blood flow to the optic nerve. Furthermore, this eye condition tends to run in families. Experts have identified genetic factors connected to high eye pressure and optic nerve damage in a few individuals.

There are no early indications in the most usual form of glaucoma. However, damaged optic nerve initial symptoms are defects in peripheral vision and trouble with night vision. Whenever diagnosed early, it can be addressed with drugs, or at times, a surgical procedure can limit vision loss.

 

Cataracts

A cataract is a common eye disease, and it is the clouding of the lens of your eye. This blurring meddles with light reaching the retina at the rear of the eye, bringing about an overall vision loss. Causes incorporate long-term exposure to the sun’s ultraviolet radiation, aging, disease, injury, and acquired issues. If you have a healthy eye, surgery can be performed to remove the cataract. Typically, the doctor or surgeon will insert an intraocular lens implant in the eye to restore your vision.

Moreover, know that cataract surgery has a high success rate in patients with healthy eyes. Nevertheless, the treatment is not generally feasible for individuals who additionally have other eye problems. These individuals may need low visual acuity rehabilitation to amplify their remaining vision.

 

Diabetic Retinopathy

Individuals with diabetes can encounter daily changes in their visual functioning due to their health condition. Diabetes can cause veins that support the retina to develop small, strange branches that leak, known as diabetic retinopathy.

Diabetic retinopathy can affect the vision and, after some time, may seriously harm the retina. Laser treatments and surgical procedures can lessen its development, yet regulating glucose is the most necessary step in dealing with diabetic retinopathy.

 

Amblyopia

In this eye condition, the visual framework fails to grow naturally during childhood. The blurry symptom in one of the two eyes is not easily rectified with ordinary glasses or contact lenses alone.

 

Retinitis Pigmentosa

Retinitis pigmentosa continuously annihilates night vision, seriously diminishes peripheral vision, and may bring about total vision impairment. A congenital disease, its first indication of night visual impairment happens typically in childhood or adolescence.

 

Retinal Detachment

Retinal detachment is an emergency condition in which the retina pulls away from its regular position. It can also result in complete vision disability in the affected eye. Causes consist of holes in the retina, infection, eye trauma, blood vessel disturbance, or a tumor. Whenever identified early, most cases can be surgically treated with vision partially or totally restored.

 

Retinopathy of Prematurity (ROP)

ROP happens in babies conceived prematurely. It is brought about by the high oxygen levels in incubators during the critical newborn period.

 

Acquired (Traumatic) Brain Injury

The eye specialist conducts a thorough eye exam on the patient.Vision can likewise be damaged or lost because of brain damage, stroke, and head injuries. Common indications include:

  • blurred vision
  • contrast sensitivity
  • glare sensitivity
  • reduced visual acuity or visual field
  • poor judgment of depth
  • double vision
  • eye misalignment
  • difficulty reading
  • dizziness
  • headaches
  • confusion when performing visual tasks
  • abnormal body posture and balance problems

Moreover, some specialists in optometry specialize in low visual acuity recovery. They study and provide rehabilitation of patients with visual disabilities.

Each sort of low-vision issue requires an alternate treatment approach. After an eye doctor conducts a complete eye assessment, which will likewise incorporate tests to conclude the patient’s doctor.

 

References:

Visual Acuity

https://www.aoa.org/healthy-eyes/vision-and-vision-correction/visual-acuity?sso=y

What is AMD?

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/age-related-macular-degeneration-amd/

Glaucoma: Treatment, Symptoms, and Causes

https://www.medicinenet.com/glaucoma/article.htm

What to know about diabetic retinopathy

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/183417

Retinal detachment

https://www.rnib.org.uk/eye-health/eye-conditions/retinal-detachment

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